Elisabeth Southorn, soprano, has taught in private and community colleges, worked extensively in churches and has sung professionally. She received her Master of Arts degree in Music from San Jose State University.  Professionally she was an Edmonton Opera Apprentice, and a member of the San Francisco Opera Chorus as well as a recitalist in the greater San Francisco Bay Area.

As a choral conductor, she served as Minister of Music and Worship at St. Stephen Lutheran Church in the Portland area from 1995 to 2008 where she created and conducted the Chautauqua Community Chorus performing masterworks and other creative choral programming from 2000-2008. With this chorus she was able to combine her love of classics with a passion for social justice raising funds and awareness for many causes at concerts. At the same time she directed youth ensembles for Calvin Presbyterian Church taking middle school youth on tours to the NW states and Canada and leading the high school singers in shows to raise funds for mission trips.

In the fall of 2014, Westchester Youth Choirs was begun here as her latest project with youth and children with a goal of raising a social conscience in youth through the performance of diverse styles.

Here at PCMK, as director of our children’s choir since fall 2012, Elisabeth introduces our children and youth to sacred music of the church here and abroad, in a variety of styles, giving them many opportunities to share their gifts in ensemble and as soloists. She also mentors old youth who assist with the choir. She leads the children and youth in annual Christmas pageants some of which she has written and arranged.

She is a long term member of ACDA (American Choral Directors Association) and NATS (National Association of Teachers of Singing).  She has studied voice with Ellie Cohen, Jo Estill and Ruth Dobson. She has taught private voice lessons more than 25 years and performs solo recitals with an emphasis on music by women composers and sings benefits to raise awareness of various social justice issues.